You are here: Home Resource Library Migrant Workers Access to Justice at Home: Indonesia

Migrant Workers Access to Justice at Home: Indonesia

— theme: Labour migration policy, Rights and protection of migrants
— country: Arab States, Indonesia
— type: Reports

October 2013 - Open Society Foundations. This report is the first comprehensive study of migrant workers’ access to justice in their country of origin. Using the case study of Indonesian migrant workers who travel to work in the Middle East, it analyses the mechanisms through which those workers may access justice in Indonesia, and the systemic barriers that prevent most workers from receiving full redress for harms that they suffer before, during, and after their work abroad.

Author/Editor
Open Society Foundations
Publishing Year
2013

Migrant Workers’ Access to Justice at Home: Indonesia is the first comprehensive study of migrant workers’ access to redress in their country of origin.

Using the example of Indonesia as a case study, the report analyses the mechanisms through which migrant workers may access justice in Indonesia or through its embassies, and the systemic barriers that prevent most workers from receiving full redress for harms that they suffer before, during, and after their work abroad. It finds that private Indonesian recruiters and insurers are rarely held responsible for rights breaches, and it makes detailed recommendations to improve migrant workers’ access to justice and private sector accountability in Indonesia and other countries of origin.

This is the first of two major empirical studies currently being undertaken by the Migrant Worker Access to Justice Project. A second report, on Nepal, will be released in mid-2014.  Both studies focus on migrant workers’ access to justice in their countries of origin, with particular attention to the Asia-Middle East Migration Corridor.

The study was conducted by Bassina Farbenblum (University of New South Wales Law Faculty), Eleanor Taylor-Nicholson (UNSW Law) and Sarah Paoletti (University of Pennsylvania Law Faculty), in partnership with Indonesian researchers.  It was funded by the Open Society Foundations’ International Migration Initiative, Tifa Foundation (Indonesia), UNSW Law and Penn Law.

The report is also available in Bahasa Indonesia.

    Document Actions
    comments powered by Disqus